<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On Jul 31, 2017, at 10:09 PM, John McCall &lt;<a href="mailto:rjmccall@apple.com" class="">rjmccall@apple.com</a>&gt; wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><div style="" class=""><blockquote type="cite" style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class="">On Jul 31, 2017, at 3:15 AM, Gor Gyolchanyan &lt;<a href="mailto:gor.f.gyolchanyan@icloud.com" class="">gor.f.gyolchanyan@icloud.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">On Jul 31, 2017, at 7:10 AM, John McCall via swift-evolution &lt;<a href="mailto:swift-evolution@swift.org" class="">swift-evolution@swift.org</a>&gt; wrote:<br class=""><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">On Jul 30, 2017, at 11:43 PM, Daryle Walker &lt;<a href="mailto:darylew@mac.com" class="">darylew@mac.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br class="">The parameters for a fixed-size array type determine the type's size/stride, so how could the bounds not be needed during compile-time? The compiler can't layout objects otherwise.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span><br class=""></blockquote><br class="">Swift is not C; it is perfectly capable of laying out objects at run time. &nbsp;It already has to do that for generic types and types with resilient members. &nbsp;That does, of course, have performance consequences, and those performance consequences might be unacceptable to you; but the fact that we can handle it means that we don't ultimately require a semantic concept of a constant expression, except inasmuch as we want to allow users to explicitly request guarantees about static layout.<br class=""></blockquote><br class="">Doesn't this defeat the purpose of generic value parameters? We might as well use a regular parameter if there's no compile-time evaluation involved. In that case, fixed-sized arrays will be useless, because they'll be normal arrays with resizing disabled.<br class=""></blockquote><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">You're making huge leaps here. &nbsp;The primary purpose of a fixed-size array feature is to allow the array to be allocated "inline" in its context instead of "out-of-line" using heap-allocated copy-on-write buffers. &nbsp;There is no reason that that representation would not be supportable just because the array's bound is not statically known; the only thing that matters is whether the bound is consistent for all instances of the container.</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">That is, it would not be okay to have a type like:</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">&nbsp;struct Widget {</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;let length: Int</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;var array: [length x Int]</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">&nbsp;}</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">because the value of the bound cannot be computed independently of a specific value.</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">But it is absolutely okay to have a type like:</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">&nbsp;struct Widget {</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;var array: [(isRunningOnIOS15() ? 20 : 10) x Int]</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">&nbsp;}</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">It just means that the bound would get computed at runtime and, presumably, cached. &nbsp;The fact that this type's size isn't known statically does mean that the compiler has to be more pessimistic, but its values would still get allocated inline into their containers and even on the stack, using pretty much the same techniques as C99 VLAs.</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div><div>I see your point. Dynamically-sized in-place allocation is something that completely escaped me when I was thinking of fixed-size arrays. I can say with confidence that a large portion of private-class-copy-on-write value types would greatly benefit from this and would finally be able to become true value types.</div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><div style="" class=""><blockquote type="cite" style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class="">As far as I know, the pinnacle of uses for fixed-size arrays is having a compile-time pre-allocated space of the necessary size (either literally at compile-time if that's a static variable, or added to the pre-computed offset of the stack pointer in case of a local variable).<br class=""></blockquote><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">The difference between having to use dynamic offsets + alloca() and static offsets + a normal stack slot is noticeable but not nearly as extreme as you're imagining. &nbsp;And again, in most common cases we would absolutely be able to fold a bound statically and fall into the optimal path you're talking about. &nbsp;The critical guarantee, that the array does not get heap-allocated, is still absolutely intact.</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div><div>Yet again, Swift (specifically - you in this case) is teaching me to trust the compiler to optimize, which is still an alien feeling to me even after all these years of heavy Swift usage. Damn you, C++ for corrupting my brain 😀.</div><div>In the specific case of having dynamic-sized in-place-allocated value types this will absolutely work. But this raises a chicken-and-the-egg problem: which is built in what: in-place allocated dynamic-sized value types, or specifically fixed-size arrays? On one hand I'm tempted to think that value types should be able to dynamically decide (inside the initializer) the exact size of the allocated memory (no less than the static size) that they occupy (no matter if on the heap, on the stack or anywhere else), after which they'd be able to access the "leftover" memory by a pointer and do whatever they want with it. This approach seems more logical, since this is essentially how fixed-size arrays would be implemented under the hood. But on the other hand, this does make use of unsafe pointers (and no part of Swift currently relies on unsafe pointers to function), so abstracting it away behind a magical fixed-size array seems safer (with a hope that a fixed-size array of UInt8 would be optimized down to exactly the first case).</div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><div style="" class=""><blockquote type="cite" style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">Value equality would still affect the type-checker, but I think we could pretty easily just say that all bound expressions are assumed to potentially resolve unequally unless they are literals or references to the same 'let' constant.<br class=""></blockquote><br class="">Shouldn't the type-checker use the Equatable protocol conformance to test for equality?<br class=""></blockquote><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">The Equatable protocol does guarantee reflexivity.</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><blockquote type="cite" style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class="">Moreover, as far as I know, Equatable is not recognized by the compiler in any way, so it's just a regular protocol.<br class=""></blockquote><div style="" class=""><br class=""></div><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular;" class="">That's not quite true: we synthesize Equatable instances in several places.</span></div></div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div style="" class=""><br class=""></div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><div style="" class=""><blockquote type="cite" style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class="">What would make it special? Some types would implement operator == to compare themselves to other types, that's beyond the scope of Equatable. What about those? And how are custom operator implementations going to serve this purpose at compile-time? Or will it just ignore the semantics of the type and reduce it to a sequence of bits? Or maybe only a few hand-picked types will be supported?<br class=""></blockquote><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><blockquote type="cite" style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><br class="">The seemingly simple generic value parameter concept gets vastly complicated and/or poorly designed without an elaborate compile-time execution system... Unless I'm missing an obvious way out.<br class=""></blockquote><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">The only thing the compiler really *needs* to know is whether two types are known to be the same, i.e. whether two values are known to be the same. </span></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div><div>I think having arbitrary value-type literals would be a great place to start. Currently there are only these types of literals:</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>* nil</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>* boolean</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>* integer</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>* floating-point</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>* string, extended grapheme cluster, unicode scalar</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>* array</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>* dictionary</div><div><br class=""></div><div>The last three of which are kinda weird because they're not really literals, because they can contains dynamically generated values.</div><div>If value types were permitted to have a special kind of initializer (I'll call it literal initializer for now), which only allows directly assigning to its stored properties or self form parameters with no operations, then that initializer could be used to produce a compile-time literal of that value type. A similar special equality operator would only allow directly comparing stored properties between two literal-capable value types.</div><div><br class=""></div><div>struct Foo {</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>literal init(one: Int, two: Float) {</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">                </span>self.one = one</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">                </span>self.two = two<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>}</div><div><br class=""></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>let one: Int</div><div><br class=""></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>let two: Float</div><div><br class=""></div><div>}</div><div><br class=""></div><div>literal static func == &nbsp;(_ some: Foo, _ other: Foo) -&gt; Bool {</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>return&nbsp;some.one == other.one &amp;&amp; some.two == other.two</div><div>}</div><div><br class=""></div><div>only assignment would be allowed in the initializer and only equality check and boolean operations would be allowed inside the equality operator. These limitations would guarantee completely deterministic literal creation and equality conformance at compile-time.</div><div>Types that conform to _BuiltinExpressibleBy*Literal would be magically equipped with both of these.</div><div>String, array and dictionary literals would be unavailable.</div><div><br class=""></div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><div style="" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">An elaborate compile-time execution system would not be sufficient here, because again, Swift is not C or C++: we need to be able to answer that question even in generic code rather than relying on the ability to fold all computations statically. &nbsp;We do not want to add an algebraic solver to the type-checker. &nbsp;The obvious alternative is to simply be conservatively correct by treating independent complex expressions as always yielding different values.</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div><div>How exactly does generic type resolution happen? Obviously, it's not all compile-time, since it has to deal with existential containers. Without customizable generic resolution, I don't see a way to implement satisfactory generic value parameters. But if we settle on magical fixed-size arrays, we wouldn't need generic value parameters, we would only need to support constraining the size of the array with Comparable operators:</div><div><br class=""></div><div>func &nbsp;foo&lt;T&gt;(_ array: T) where T: [Int], T.count == 5 {</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>// ...</div><div>}&nbsp;</div><div><br class=""></div><div>let array: [5 of Int] = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]</div><div>foo(array)</div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><div style="" class=""><blockquote type="cite" style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">The only hard constraint is that types need to be consistent, but that just means that we need to have a model in which bound expressions are evaluated exactly once at runtime (and of course typically folded at compile time).<br class=""></blockquote><br class="">What exactly would it take to be able to execute select piece of code at compile-time? Taking the AST, converting it to LLVM IR and feeding it to the MCJIT engine seems to be easy enough. But I'm pretty sure it's more tricky than that. Is there a special assumption or two made about the code that prevents this from happening?<br class=""></blockquote><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">We already have the ability to fold simple expressions in SIL; we would just make sure that could handle anything that we considered really important and allow everything else to be handled dynamically.</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div><div>So, with some minor adjustments, we could get a well-defined subset of Swift that can be executed at compile-time to yield values that would pass as literals in any context?</div><div>This would some day allow relaxing the limitations on literal initializers and literal equality operators by pre-computing and caching values at compile-time outside the scope of the type checker, allowing the type checker to stay simple, while essentially allowing generics with complex resolution logic.</div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><div style="" class=""><span style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">John.</span><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><br style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><blockquote type="cite" style="font-family: AvenirNext-Regular; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">John.<br class=""><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">Or do you mean that the bounds are integer literals? (That's what I have in the design document now.)<br class=""><br class="">Sent from my iPhone<br class=""><br class="">On Jul 30, 2017, at 8:51 PM, John McCall &lt;<a href="mailto:rjmccall@apple.com" class="">rjmccall@apple.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br class=""><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">On Jul 29, 2017, at 7:01 PM, Daryle Walker via swift-evolution &lt;<a href="mailto:swift-evolution@swift.org" class="">swift-evolution@swift.org</a>&gt; wrote:<br class="">The “constexpr” facility from C++ allows users to define constants and functions that are determined and usable at compile-time, for compile-time constructs but still usable at run-time. The facility is a key step for value-based generic parameters (and fixed-size arrays if you don’t want to be stuck with integer literals for bounds). Can figuring out Swift’s story here be part of Swift 5?<br class=""></blockquote><br class="">Note that there's no particular reason that value-based generic parameters, including fixed-size arrays, actually need to be constant expressions in Swift.<br class=""><br class="">John.<br class=""></blockquote></blockquote><br class="">_______________________________________________<br class="">swift-evolution mailing list<br class=""><a href="mailto:swift-evolution@swift.org" class="">swift-evolution@swift.org</a><br class="">https://lists.swift.org/mailman/listinfo/swift-evolution</blockquote></blockquote></div></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></body></html>